An exploration of the evolving study of consumer behavior from the Yale Center for Customer Insights

"While it’s intuitively appealing to believe that feelings of guilt will negatively affect the pleasure one receives from an indulgent, or hedonic, experience, research by Yale Center for Customer Insights Fellows find otherwise. Quite the contrary, they’ve found that guilt may be a key mechanism for enhancing pleasure.”
Read more.
"While it’s intuitively appealing to believe that feelings of guilt will negatively affect the pleasure one receives from an indulgent, or hedonic, experience, research by Yale Center for Customer Insights Fellows find otherwise. Quite the contrary, they’ve found that guilt may be a key mechanism for enhancing pleasure.”
Read more.

"While it’s intuitively appealing to believe that feelings of guilt will negatively affect the pleasure one receives from an indulgent, or hedonic, experience, research by Yale Center for Customer Insights Fellows find otherwise. Quite the contrary, they’ve found that guilt may be a key mechanism for enhancing pleasure.”

Read more.

How does unpacking information affect how we perceive the odds of the outcome? It might not be how you’d think.  Read more.
How does unpacking information affect how we perceive the odds of the outcome? It might not be how you’d think.  Read more.

How does unpacking information affect how we perceive the odds of the outcome? It might not be how you’d think.  Read more.

Surprising research by Yale CCI Fellow, Prof. Zoë Chance with colleagues from Harvard Business School and Wharton found that when people spent time on behalf of others, they felt they had more time. Learn how giving time really gets you time.
Surprising research by Yale CCI Fellow, Prof. Zoë Chance with colleagues from Harvard Business School and Wharton found that when people spent time on behalf of others, they felt they had more time. Learn how giving time really gets you time.

Surprising research by Yale CCI Fellow, Prof. Zoë Chance with colleagues from Harvard Business School and Wharton found that when people spent time on behalf of others, they felt they had more time. Learn how giving time really gets you time.

 
How much for that bicycle wheel and stool? How much for that bicycle wheel and stool created by Marcel Duchamp? Why the difference?
In “Art and Authenticity: The Importance of Originals in Judgments of Value,” published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Yale Assistant Professor George E. Newman and Professor Paul Bloom use an array of experiments to explain exactly why art connoisseurs put such a high value on the original art. Learn more about the studies, here.
 
How much for that bicycle wheel and stool? How much for that bicycle wheel and stool created by Marcel Duchamp? Why the difference?
In “Art and Authenticity: The Importance of Originals in Judgments of Value,” published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Yale Assistant Professor George E. Newman and Professor Paul Bloom use an array of experiments to explain exactly why art connoisseurs put such a high value on the original art. Learn more about the studies, here.

 

How much for that bicycle wheel and stool? How much for that bicycle wheel and stool created by Marcel Duchamp? Why the difference?

In “Art and Authenticity: The Importance of Originals in Judgments of Value,” published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Yale Assistant Professor George E. Newman and Professor Paul Bloom use an array of experiments to explain exactly why art connoisseurs put such a high value on the original art. Learn more about the studies, here.

Self-control, it turns out, is a limited resource, “akin to strength or energy,” write the YCCI Fellows of their recent study on the topic. “As a result, any use of executive function appears to reduce the available quantity of this resource, resulting in poorer self-regulation in subsequent, even unrelated, tasks.” 
To learn more about how energy depletion changes the way we make decisions, read more here.
Self-control, it turns out, is a limited resource, “akin to strength or energy,” write the YCCI Fellows of their recent study on the topic. “As a result, any use of executive function appears to reduce the available quantity of this resource, resulting in poorer self-regulation in subsequent, even unrelated, tasks.” 
To learn more about how energy depletion changes the way we make decisions, read more here.

Self-control, it turns out, is a limited resource, “akin to strength or energy,” write the YCCI Fellows of their recent study on the topic. “As a result, any use of executive function appears to reduce the available quantity of this resource, resulting in poorer self-regulation in subsequent, even unrelated, tasks.”

To learn more about how energy depletion changes the way we make decisions, read more here.

The world of (customer) rewards serves two ends: to build customer loyalty and entice new business. But is one more important than the other? To whom should firms offer a better deal?
- Read more about who should get the deal in the award-winning research by YaleCCI scholars Prof. Sudhir and Prof. Shin.